Salvia plebeian

Salvia plebeian

Botanical Name:         Salvia plebeia R. Brown.Salvia plebeian

Synonym:                      Acacia arabica,

Kingdom:                       Plantae

Order:                             Lamiales

Family:                           Lamiaceae

Genus:                             Salvia

Local Name:                 Kamarkas

Sindhi Name:               Kamarkas

English Name:             Plebian

Part Used:                     Whole plant Extract

 

Description

Salvia plebeia R. Brown. is an annual herb, it grows on hillsides, and stream sides. Leaves are oblong to ovate, petiole is narrowly winged, inflorescence is branched, and bracts are present. Flowers are pale pink or purple in color. Nutlets are ovoid, smooth, and brownish in color [1, 2].

Occurrence

It is distributed in Asia, Iran, Afghanistan, China, Japan, Australia, Pakistan, Himalaya, India, and Malaysia [1, 2].

Ethnomedicinal Uses in Skin Diseases

Crushed Salvia plebeian R. Brown. (Plebian), Quercusinfectoria Olivier (Gall oak), and Citruluscolocynthis(L.) Schard (Bitter apple) is mixed with salt, one tablespoon of this mixture is taken orally for the treatment of candida infection in District sanghar (Sindh).

Chemical Constituents

Salvia plebeia mainly contain flavones, lignans and diterpenoids [3, 4].  Some other constituents are hispidulin-7-O-d-glucoside, hispidulin-7-glucuronide, 6-methoxyluteolin-7-glucoside, β-sitosterol, conferyl aldehyde, and 2′-hydroxyl-5′-methoxy biochanin A [5].

Chemical Structure:

Salvia plebeian.st

 

Medicinal Uses and Pharmacology/Scientific Studies

In Asia seeds are used for the treatment of gonorrhea, to promote sexual power and for curing seminal weakness. Seeds are also used as diuretic, astringent, and vermifuge agent and for relieving toothache [6]. This plant also exhibited antioxidant activities [7], aqueous extract of Salvia plebeia has antiallergic activities [8], anti-tumor activity [9], anti-inflammatory and related anti-nociceptive and anti-angiogenic activities [10].

REFERENCES

  1. http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=5&taxon_id=200020242
  2. Nagaraju, N., &Rao, K. N. (1990). A survey of plant crude drugs of Rayalaseema, Andhra Pradesh, India.Journal of Ethnopharmacology29(2), 137-158.
  3. Plattner, R. D., & Powell, R. G. (1978). A secoisolariciresinol branched fatty diester from Salvia plebeiaPhytochemistry17(1), 149-150.
  4. García-Alvarez, M. C., Hasan, M., Michavila, A., Fernández-Gadea, F., & Rodríguez, B. (1985). Epoxysalviacoccina, neo-clerodanediterpenoid from Salvia plebeia.Phytochemistry25(1), 272-274.
  5. Weng, X. C., & Wang, W. (2000). Antioxidant activity of compounds isolated from Salvia plebeia.Food Chemistry71(4), 489-493.
  6. Bozeman, B., & Corley, E. (2004). Scientists’ collaboration strategies: implications for scientific and technical human capital.Research Policy,33(4), 599-616.
  7. Lim, J. A., Yun, B. W., &Baek, S. H. (2007). Antioxidative Activity and Nitrite Scavenging Ability of Methanol Extract from Salvia plebeia Br.Korean Journal of Medicinal Crop Science,15(3), 183-188.
  8. Shin, T. Y., & Kim, H. M. (2002). Inhibition of immediate-type allergic reactions by the aqueous extract of Salvia plebeia.Immunopharmacology and immunotoxicology24(2), 303-314.
  9. Jung, H. J., Song, Y. S., Lim, C. J., & Park, E. H. (2009). Anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic and anti-nociceptive activities of an ethanol extract of Salvia plebeia Brown.Journal of Ethnopharmacology126(2), 355-360.
  10. Jung, H. J., Song, Y. S., Lim, C. J., & Park, E. H. (2009). Anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic and anti-nociceptive activities of an ethanol extract of Salvia plebeia Brown.Journal of Ethnopharmacology126(2), 355-360.